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Could a substance found in certain fish improve literacy levels in children – and if so, how? Research from Oxford University's Centre for Evidence-Based Intervention in the Department of Social Policy aims to answer these questions.

Dr Alex Richardson and Professor Paul Montgomery from Oxford University's Centre for Evidence-Based Intervention in the Department of Social Policy and Intervention have shown that a representative sample of UK schoolchildren aged seven to nine years had low levels of key Omega-3 fatty acids in their blood. Furthermore, the study found that children’s blood levels of the long-chain Omega-3 DHA (the form found in most abundance in the brain) ‘significantly predicted’ how well they were able to concentrate and learn.  Learn more about their research.

This animation is part of the Social Sciences: Bright Ideas series. You can watch more films and animations about Social Sciences research and impact at: www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/research/videos