Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Oxford University’s Radcliffe Meteorological Station is the longest running weather station in the UK. On 15 May, the Met Office will present an award to the University ‘in recognition of 200 years of continuous climate observations at the Radcliffe Observatory, Oxford’.

The Station, based at Green Templeton College and maintained by the University’s School of Geography and the Environment, holds the longest series of temperature and rainfall records for one site in Britain, with daily full records from 1815, and less frequent observations dating as far back as 1767.

Phil Johnson, Regional Network Manager for the Met Office, will present a commemorative shield to Richard Washington, Professor of Climate Science at the University’s School of Geography and the Environment. Also at the presentation will be members of the Royal Meteorological Society, who are visiting the Observatory that day as part of the bicentennial celebrations.

Professor Washington said: ‘We are delighted that the Met Office should recognise the University’s contribution in this way. It provides a moment to pause and remember those with the foresight to embark on extraordinary efforts to record the weather each day so long ago – long before the justification of climate change was to hand. Ours is an old planet yet one with a very young observational record. But without those 200 years of data, nature, and the way we are influencing it, would be so much harder to understand.’

Read more on the University website

Read more about the School of Geography and the Environment

Read more about the Radcliffe Meteorological Station