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Social scientists at Oxford are seeking answers to some of the world’s most important challenges. How can we tackle climate change? What needs to happen to resolve poverty? How should we respond to the economic crises? How should we fight for our human rights? Here we bring you the latest of our major discoveries in the social sciences at Oxford.

Teaching excellence in the Social Sciences Division

Teaching excellence in the Social Sciences Division

Business Economics Education Law Politics International Development

The Teaching Awards are an opportunity for the Oxford University Students Union (OUSU) to celebrate tutors, lecturers, supervisors and support staff who go above and beyond their normal duties to deliver exceptionally excellent support to our students and are an important part of OUSU’s work on the academic experience at Oxford.

'Inside the world's largest higher education boom'

'Inside the world's largest higher education boom'

Economics Research The Conversation

The article 'Inside the world's largest higher education boom' has been published on The Conversation. It was written by Katherine Stapleton, PhD student in the Department of Economics.

UK employment tribunal fees deny workers access to justice, says study

UK employment tribunal fees deny workers access to justice, says study

Economics Research

UK workers are being illegally denied access to justice, according to Oxford academics in a forthcoming article in the journal, Modern Law Review. Their conclusions support an ongoing legal challenge to the employment tribunal fees regime, heard by the Supreme Court this week.

'Are the rich really getter poorer and the poor getting richer?'

'Are the rich really getter poorer and the poor getting richer?'

Geography Economics Research The Conversation

The article 'Are the rich really getter poorer and the poor getting richer?' has been published on The Conversation. It was written by Danny Dorling, Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford.

'It’s official: inequality, climate change and social polarisation are bad for you'

'It’s official: inequality, climate change and social polarisation are bad for you'

Economics Environment The Conversation

The article 'It’s official: inequality, climate change and social polarisation are bad for you' has been published on The Conversation. It was written by Jonathan Michie, Professor of Innovation & Knowledge Exchange at the University of Oxford.

Economist Professor Sir Tony Atkinson 'pioneered the study of inequality'

Economist Professor Sir Tony Atkinson 'pioneered the study of inequality'

Economics

Sir Tony Atkinson, Professor of Economics and a former Warden of Nuffield College, who died on 1 January 2017, has been called 'the godfather of modern scholarship on the distribution of income and wealth' by fellow economist Thomas Piketty. Sir Andrew Dilnot Warden of Nuffield said he would be remembered for his 'belief that things could be done to improve the world'.

Oxford Social Scientists awarded prestigious ERC Consolidator Grants

Oxford Social Scientists awarded prestigious ERC Consolidator Grants

Funding Research Economics Geography Politics

Three researchers in the Social Sciences Division have been awarded highly competitive European Research Council (ERC) Consolidator Grants. The ERC bestows the grants to outstanding researchers who have a promising scientific track record, and between 7-12 years of experience after the completion of their doctorates.

Anthony Venables appointed chair of the Scientific Advisory Council for the Ifo Institute and CESifo

Anthony Venables appointed chair of the Scientific Advisory Council for the Ifo Institute and CESifo

Economics Appointment

Professor Anthony Venables CBE, BP Professor of Economics and Director of OxCARRE, has been appointed chair of the Scientific Advisory Council for the Ifo Institute and CESifo from 2016 to 2019.

Researchers Awarded Philip Leverhulme Prizes

Researchers Awarded Philip Leverhulme Prizes

Award Research Anthropology Economics Geography

Dr Susana Carvalho, Professor Kalina Manova and Professor Mark Graham have each been awarded a prestigious Philip Leverhulme Prize.

The benefits of forced experimentation: Evidence from the London Underground network

The benefits of forced experimentation: Evidence from the London Underground network

Economics Research

Ferdinand Rauch's analysis of the London Tube strike in 2014 found that despite the inconvenience to tens of thousands of people, the strike actually produced a net economic benefit, due to the number of people who found more efficient ways to get to work.

Satellite images show poor populations around the world in darkness at night

Satellite images show poor populations around the world in darkness at night

Economics Research

Economists from the University of Oxford have come up with a novel approach for measuring global poverty – counting the number of people who live in darkness at night.

Countries with the world's richest one per cent

Countries with the world's richest one per cent

Economics Research

A new study has examined the varying fortunes of the world’s richest people between 1988 and 2012 to identify which parts of the world the top 1% come from.

Small firms can provide jobs, but big firms are the key to economic growth in Africa

Small firms can provide jobs, but big firms are the key to economic growth in Africa

Economics Research The Conversation

The article 'Small firms can provide jobs, but big firms are the key to economic growth in Africa' has been published on The Conversation. It was written by Francis Teal, a Research Associate in the Department of Economics at the University of Oxford.

The fast road out of poverty?

The fast road out of poverty?

Economics Research

New research has measured the 'wealth effect' of upgrading the infrastructure in poorer sections of cities.

A million dollar baby?

A million dollar baby?

Economics Research

A study of millions of first births in the United States shows how mothers in particular professions are likely to choose the season for when their baby is born.

What makes companies in one country so much more productive than in another?

What makes companies in one country so much more productive than in another?

Economics Research The Conversation

Francis Teal, Research Associate at the Centre for the Study of African Economies, comments on the differences that exist in the productivity of manufacturing firms in different countries.

The London Tube strike 'brought economic benefits for workers'

The London Tube strike 'brought economic benefits for workers'

Research Economics

New analysis of the London Tube strike in February 2014 finds that it enabled a sizeable fraction of commuters to find better routes to work, and actually produced a net economic benefit due to the number of people who found more efficient ways to get to work.