Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Professor Susan Bright of the University of Oxford’s Faculty of Law works with the Energy Saving Trust (EST), to identify real, practical solutions that can make flats and other leasehold properties more energy efficient, warmer and lower carbon.

Image credit: Shutterstock

In order to reach the UKs carbon-reduction goals by 2050, major energy upgrades to homes are needed. In addition to the economic, behavioural and technological hurdles to improving energy efficiency in housing, numerous legal barriers also exist.  There are particular challenges in blocks of flats.  A large number of different parties can have a title to – or responsibility for – any given block of flats: freeholders, leaseholders, short-term tenants, mortgagees and management companies. Getting all (or the required number) of these parties to agree for building-wide energy efficiency improvement works is practically and legally difficult.

In this Knowledge Exchange partnership funded by the Higher Education Innovation Fund, Professor Susan Bright of the University of Oxford’s Faculty of Law will work Mr David Weatherall, Director at Future Climate and Policy Advisor at the Energy Saving Trust (EST), to identify real, practical solutions that can make flats and other leasehold properties more energy efficient, warmer and lower carbon. As well as developing solutions, they hope to convince policy makers and influencers that progress is possible.

To achieve these goals, among other activities, Professor Bright and Mr Weatherall will hold one-to-one meetings and workshops with national policymakers, local authorities, NGOs and trade associations. They will also set up a webpage via the EST website to provide consumer advice. Finding the solutions to the legal difficulties involved in energy upgrades in leasehold properties at the heart of this partnership will deliver reduced carbon emissions from the domestic sector and provide safer, warmer homes for individuals and families across the UK.

This project was funded through the University of Oxford's Higher Education Innovation Fund (HEIF 5) allocation.

 

Themes