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Dr Gavin Killip of the Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment worked with the Oxfordshire Construction Training Group (OCTG) and Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) to bring insights from research into the practical world of vocational training.

Bringing insights from research to the practical world of vocational training in the construction industry

Like many other countries, the UK is looking for ways to reduce energy demands in housing, but developments in engineering and technology are progressing faster than the skills and knowledge needed to implement them.  Dr Gavin Killip, IAA Early Career Fellow mentored by Dr Nick Eyre, of the School of Geography and the Environment worked with the Oxfordshire Construction Training Group (OCTG) and Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) to help remedy that.  He developed pilot training courses for sustainable construction using innovative app-based training materials. Much of the work was based on the principle of ‘action learning’, which combines the prior knowledge of each partner with collaborative questioning and reflection.  Such learning then feeds into a series of iterative ‘learning loops’, from which outputs such as new training programmes emerge. 

In the autumn of 2015, Dr Killip was working alongside OCTG and SQA to prepare assessment material for use in colleges around the country.  He also hopes to team up with a course evaluator from the SQA to visit colleges where the training course is being piloted.

Through this ESRC IAA KE Fellowship, Dr Killip has been able to bring insights from research into the practical world of vocational training, and has developed good working relationships with non-academic partners. 

This project was funded by Oxford's ESRC Impact Acceleration Account.

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