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Conference schedule

Plenary sessions and Case Studies - Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre (MOLT)
Panel Discussions - Ruth Deech Building Seminar Room 7
Sharing Sessions - Ruth Deech Building Seminar Room 8
Target Group Workshops - Seminar Room 1 in the Victoria House adjacent to MOLT
Skills Workshops - Seminar Room 5 in the Victorian House adjacent to MOLT

Lunch, coffee breaks and drinks receptions all held in Ruth Deech Building lower ground floor
Prize ceremony - Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre

0900-0930 | Registration and coffee

0930-1030 | Plenary panel 

Panel discussion with Q&A: What is the future for impact in the social sciences, beyond REF?

1030-1045 | Coffee

CASE STUDIES

PANEL DISCUSSIONS

SHARING SESSIONS

TARGET GROUP WORKSHOPS

SKILLS WORKSHOPS

1045-1140 | Session 1 

1A Research into action: improving water security in developing countries

1B Legal impacts aren’t just for lawyers

1C Creative approaches to impact and engagement

1D Values, confidence and time: successful collaboration with civil society organisations

1E Talking to the media: How to find and share the story in your research

1140-1150 | Comfort break

1150-1240 | Session 2

2A Scaling up impact through a partnership ecosystem

 

2B Exploring models for
genuine co-production of
impact

2C Delivering impact with vulnerable and
disadvantaged groups

2D How to have an A* impact in the classroom

2E Impact literacy for researchers and professional
staff

1240-1340 | LUNCH

1340-1430 | Session 3

3A Impact and
Influence through the media

3B Transferable models of truly  engaged research

3C Influencing
organisational behaviour
and practices

3D Working with local, national and regional
policy-makers in developing
countries

3E Embracing drama and performance for impact

1430-1500 | Exhibition, coffee and cake

1500-1550 | Session 4

4A From counterterrorism
to employment
tribunals: academic engagement with UK and foreign policy.

4B Working in
partnership for educational and learning
impacts

4C Developing guidance
and tools for policy and
practice

4D Could  business be the vehicle for your social impact?

4E The expert guide to social
media: how to know if it’s
working (or not)

1550-1600 | Comfort break

1600-1700 | Closing Plenary Keynote

Dr Caroline Kenny, Social Science Advisor at the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology and

Alun Evans, Chief Executive of the British Academy.

Closing remarks – Professor Mark Pollard, Chair of the University of
Oxford ESRC Impact Acceleration Account

1700-1800 | Drinks reception

1800-1830 | Awards ceremony

1830-1930 | Drinks reception

1930 | Close

*Programme subject to change

Panel discussion: What is the future for impact in the social sciences, beyond REF?

Welcome from host and session chair: Professor Mark Pollard, Associate Head of Division (Research), Social Sciences Division, University of Oxford and Chair of the Oxford ESRC Impact Acceleration Account.

Panellists:

  • Dr Melanie Knetsch, ESRC's Strategic Lead for Interdisciplinarity, Innovation and Impact
  • Dr Julie Bayley, Health Psychologist, incoming Director of Research Impact Development at University of Lincoln and ARMA Impact Champion
  • Professor Peter Kemp, Vice-Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government, and University of Oxford Social Sciences Division Strategic Impact Lead

Session 1 in summary:

1A CASE STUDIES: Research into action: improving water security in developing countries

This session explores two projects responding to water provision challenges in two African nations. The cultural and socio-political sensitivities of water security in a development setting, combined with an increasing pressure from funders to measure impact and demonstrate translation of ‘research into action’ create unique challenges and opportunities for interdisciplinary research.

  • Research into action: working with local stakeholders in interdisciplinary water research in Ethiopia
    Dr Catherine  Fallon Grasham, Oxford University Centre for the Environment, University of Oxford
  • Water pumps and solidarity in rural Madagascar
    Dr Sara de Wit, Institute for Science, Innovation and Society, University of Oxford

1B PANEL DISCUSSION: Legal impacts aren’t just for lawyers

This panel will present and discuss a range of projects, both from legal researchers and those from other disciplines who are having legal impacts. Hear about some of the life-changing impacts from researchers working on victim participation at the International Criminal Court, using longitudinal data to strengthen approaches to combatting child marriage in India, bringing together Ombudsmen with their watchers, and using economic analysis to overturn employment tribunal fees in a Supreme Court judgement.

Chairs: Karen Eveleigh and Elizabeth Hodges, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford

  • How does an economist influence Supreme Court decisions?
    Prof Abigail Adams, Department of Economics, University of Oxford
  • Building relationships that last: Stakeholder engagement
    Dr Naomi Creutzfeldt, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford
  • Advancing the impact of Victim participation at the International Criminal Court: Bridging the gap between research and practice
    Dr Rudina Jasini, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford
  • Young Lives project: Brighter futures for girls- using Young Lives evidence to tackle child marriage in India
    Frances Winter, Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford

1C SHARING SESSION: Creative approaches to impact and engagement

Learn how to make a difference with your research in unusual and creative ways. In this session researchers will share their experiences of film-making, theatre and exhibitions to engage audiences on range of issues ranging from safeguarding children whose mothers are being sentenced, challenging abortion stigma through storytelling, exploring minority group bereavement and memorial provision through images, and using a stage play to explore sociologies of modern motherhood.

  • Abortion Stigma: resistance and rejection- Translating research results into effective public engagement
    Dr Lesley Hoggart, School of Health, Wellbeing and Social Care, The Open University and Dr Imogen Goold, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford
  • Planned and unplanned Impact in the Deathscapes and Diversity project
    Dr Avril Maddrell, Dr Brenda Mathijssen and Dr Danny McNally, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Reading
  • Doing impact: research, impact and serendipity
    Professor Tina Miller, Department of Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University
  • Safeguarding Children when Sentencing Mothers: The collaborative design of research-based films for use by criminal justice professionals
    Dr Shona Minson, Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford

1D TARGET GROUP WORKSHOP: Values, confidence and time: successful collaboration with civil society organisations

Workshop led by: William Allen, Centre on Migration Policy and Society, University of Oxford and Dr Christopher Shaw, Climate Outreach

What are the key ingredients are to making partnerships with charities, NGOs, and voluntary organisations work? Hear from two speakers who are well-qualified to understand how to overcome practical sticking points: one, a researcher who has carried out a wide-ranging study of civil society organisations in the UK; the other a researcher turned climate change communications practitioner. How do stakeholder values shape academic collaborations? How external partners understand what constitutes evidence? Discover some practical tips for engaging and communicating at all levels, from individuals to across sectors.

1E SKILLS WORKSHOP: Talking to the media: How to find and share the story in your research

Workshop led by: Claire Bolderson and Caroline Finnigan, Engaging Communications

A practical workshop to help you present the best of your research and your expertise to a wider audience. Caroline Finnigan is a former BBC senior producer. Claire Bolderson is a former BBC News correspondent and presenter. Both continue to make documentaries for the BBC. In addition to running workshops on engagement with the media, with policy makers and with funders, they also train journalists in the UK and internationally.

NB If you would like to book a 1:1 practice interview and consultation with Claire and Caroline in the afternoon, please contact us via impact@socsci.ox.ac.uk. You will need to submit some brief information about you and your research so they can prepare in advance.

Session 2 in summary:

2A CASE STUDIES: Scaling up impact through a partnership ecosystem

When research impact is successful, how could and should you go about scaling it up? These case studies explore the factors to consider. One project uses research that integrates information to improve service quality and efficiency in Chinese healthcare, has now been implemented in 2,500 hospitals across China; the second project has seen a project working to prevent HIV in young people in South Africa expand internationally in Africa, Europe, and Asia. Both speakers will talk about the balance of the partner ecosystems that they work in and how this changes as projects have expanded.

  • Controlled explosion? Scaling up research findings for Africa’s adolescents
    Professor Lucie Cluver, Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford
  • Building an integrated data platform changing practice in Chinese and UK hospitals
    Dr Weizi Li, Henley Business School, University of Reading

2B PANEL DISCUSSION: Exploring models for genuine co-production of impact

True two-way collaboration between researchers and non-academic partners is the gold standard for impact, but it is tricky to manage. Join this panel discussion to hear some experienced voices share their models. Examples include ‘Innovation Labs’ for educational reform in Peru, enhancing the uptake, utility and value of decision support tools for built environment practitioners and an experience based approach to policy engagement in a politically and economically challenging environment.

Chair: Dr Pete Walton, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford.

  • Collaboration and synergies among researchers and policymakers during the Peruvian Education Reform
    Maria Rebeca Barron Rodriguez, Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford
  • Leading health policy in an under-resourced environment: Lessons from an ongoing collaborative project
    Dr Karin Eli, School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, University of Oxford and Daniel Rotenburg, Israeli Ministry of Health
  • Enhancing co-production, uptake and impact of decision support models. Examples from the built environment
    Briony Turner, Institute for Environmental Analytics, University of Reading (and Katie Jenkins, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford

2C SHARING SESSION: Delivering impact with vulnerable and disadvantaged groups

Social sciences have much to contribute to improving the lives of our most vulnerable groups. In this session researchers will share their experiences of working to help agencies and community members to improve welfare and well-being. The projects presented aim to build skills, confidence, and personal development in women and girls, and to increase protection for young internet users.

  • Go _ Girl Code+Create: Partnerships supporting NEET women to pursue technology-related careers
    Dr Tracey Denton-Calabrese, Department of Education, University of Oxford
  • Developing confidence as well as impact a collaborative approach
    Dr Carol Fuller, Institute of Education, University of Reading
  • Bit by Bit: How to Break the Barrier
    Allison Mishkin, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford
  • Anthropology’s Place: Impact and Interdisciplinarity in Online Sexual Offending Research
    Dr Jonah Rimer, School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, University of Oxford

2D TARGET GROUP WORKSHOP: How to have an A* impact in the classroom

Workshop led by: Dr Katharine Burn, Dr Velda Elliott and Dr Jenni Ingram, Department of Education, University of Oxford, and Dr Jessica Lutkin, Research Enterprise Services, University of Reading

What are the practical considerations when working with schools for impact? This workshop explores the realities of engaging with teachers, learners and schools at different levels as well as with education policy-makers. Using lessons learned and successes from past projects and case studies, together with tips for increasing the likelihood of achieving impact.

2E SKILLS WORKSHOP: Taking charge through Impact literacy

Workshop led by: Dr Julie Bayley, ARMA Impact Champion

Do you feel that you know all that you need to optimise your impact activities and success? This is an interactive workshop exploring the skills, competencies and understanding individual researchers and support staff need in order to be ‘impact literate’.

Building impact into the research process - alongside the pressures associated with funding and assessment agendas - can be challenging.  With impact resistant to templating, and with all research needing different pathways towards change, it's therefore vital that individuals are equipped to make good impact choices. For this, it's imperative that the research community becomes impact literate. In this session, there will be a short presentation about impact literacy, followed by a group activity to consider elements of literacy and how they may be strengthened in practice. 

Session 3 in summary:

3A CASE STUDIES: Impact and Influence through the media

How can you make media work count in terms of impact and influence? Our speakers are all established communicators, with research engagement at the heart of their work. They are also highly experienced in dealing with controversial or politically significant topics (migration, identity, poverty to name a few) in. In this session, you will be able to take away some of the routes to success and pitfalls to avoid – helpful both if you are looking to approach the media, but also if the media approach you.

  • Case studies in tricky subjects - inequality, elitism, and death
    Professor Danny Dorling, School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford
  • From front pages to tabloid rages: influencing the migration debate
    Madeleine Sumption and Mikal Mast, The Migration Observatory, University of Oxford

3B PANEL DISCUSSION: Transferrable models of truly engaged research

The projects in this session all have engagement and impact at their core. Whether setting up academic- industry partners with businesses, developing educators use of publisher’s systems to support literacy, or ensuring that young people can be actively involved in shaping mental health research, this session explores how making stakeholders an active part of the process of research offers organic opportunities and exciting directions.

Chair: Naomi Gibson, Medical Sciences Division, University of Oxford

  • Where are we going and how do we get there? A study of OUP Pathways to School Improvement (Design led research approach)
    Susila Davis-Singaravelu, Department of Education, University of Oxford
  • Developing a Young People’s Advisory Group for Neuroscience Ethics
    Jessica Lorimer, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford and Oliver Tailby (Chipping Norton School)
  • Building Impact-Centric Academic-Industry Research Partnerships
    Professor Andrew Stephen, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford

3C SHARING SESSION: Influencing people, organisational behaviour, and practices

How do you change the way an organisation works? Or get people to adopt new habits for the better? Learn how researchers have been working with Microsoft and the NHS to develop virtual consultations with doctors via video and Skype, how a collaboration with Samsung and Age UK is using wearable technology to improve the health of older people, and how business research has guided an international food company with a pilot designed to tack malnutrition in India. A great opportunity to hear from academics working in tandem with large-scale corporations.

  • Business pilots of Multinational Corporations: A unique setting for social science research
    Dr Sudhir Rama Murthy, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford and Alastair Colin-Jones, Mars Inc.
  • Approaches to bridge diverse stakeholder perspectives in a research programme on activity monitors
    Professor Shailey Minocha, Dr Ana Despina-Tudor, and team, Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, The Open University

  • Co-evolving virtual consultation services within the NHS
    Dr Joseph Wherton , Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford and rep from Barts Health NHS Trust.

 

3D TARGET GROUP WORKSHOP: Working with local, national and regional policy-makers in developing countries

Workshop led by: Professor Lucie Cluver, Roxanna Haghighat, Maria Michalopoulou, Anna Carlqvist and Camille Wittesaele, Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford

“You academicians act like we’re stupid. You try running my country”: Lessons from working with local, national and regional policy-makers in Africa

The team from the Young Carers project will share lessons from working with local, national and regional policy-makers in Africa and help participants to know what to expect and to know how best to approach and engage with policymakers in a developing country context.

3E SKILLS WORKSHOP: Unlocking public engagement through drama and performance

Workshop led by: William Allen, Centre on Migration, Policy and Society, University of Oxford and Ida Persson and Vanessa Hughes (ActREAL)

Are you thinking of communicating your research or engaging with the public? Is your research topic tricky, controversial or sensitive? Would you like to find new ways of creating deeper engagement with your stakeholders? Do you want to explore the human element of social sciences research - and to connect people with ideas in a different way?

This session will share experiences and lessons learned from a project that combined quantitative media research with multi-sensory, creative activities to challenge participants to think about how they consume media and how they are influenced by what they see and hear. Hear from the researcher's perspective but also learn from the professionals and actors helping to make this happen.

Ida Persson and Vanessa Hughes from ActREAL will share their professional experience bringing academic research on social issues into the community by using theatre and performance to bring it to life. Examples of their work include engaging school pupils with stories of undocumented migrant children to unlock understanding and empathy, engaging students on the debates, relationships and personal stories involved in the current migration crisis, and using comedy and outreach to bring research to life, and really making a difference to people.

Session 4 in summary:

4A CASE STUDIES:  From counter-terrorism to employment tribunals: academic engagement with UK and foreign policy.

This session showcases the DPIR Academic-Policy Dialogue Initiative on Countering Violent Extremism (CVE). The presentation will include contributions from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and will include practical strategies for incorporating academic research into the policy-making pipeline. The second case study reveals how an economist influenced the Supreme Court decision on the abolition of the Ministry of Justice’s employment tribunal fees.

  • Access to Justice and the Economics of the Rule of Law
    Prof Abigail Adams, Department of Economics, University of Oxford
  • Building Partnerships That Last: Lessons from Oxford DPIR’s Academic-Policy Dialogue Initiative
    Dr Carlotta Minnella, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford and Louise Barton (Foreign and Commonwealth Office, UK)

4B PANEL DISCUSSION: Working in partnership for educational and learning impacts

Educational impacts don’t have to happen in a lesson format. Find out how researchers are creating partnerships between early years learning practitioners and parents with a view to better communicate the benefits of play-based learning; how one researcher collaborated with heritage partners to change their approach to history education through outdoor learning; and how early work on learning analytics has helped to build a European community of practitioners in this field.

Chair: Dr Carol Fuller, Institute of Education, University of Reading

  • Building a European learning analytics community
    Dr Rebecca Ferguson, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University
  • “Strange goings-on” – working together to develop the benefits of learning primary history through outdoor pedagogy
    Dr R. Harris, Institute of Education, University of Reading with Fiona Craig and Neil Gauld, Ufton Court Trust
  • Identifying impact when working in partnership with practitioners and parents in the early years
    Dr Maria Kambouri-Danos, Institute of Education, University of Reading

 

4C SHARING SESSION: Developing guidance and tools for policy and practice

Toolkits, ‘how to’ books and guidance documents are all useful tools to empower and enable stakeholders to use your research to change the way they operate. In this session, researchers who have written ‘how to’ guides for small states on conducting international trade negotiations, guidance on design for building schools, and toolkits for small businesses to help them grow sustainably will share their experience and advice.

  • Growing green?: co-creating an evidence-based engagement model for smaller businesses
    Professor Richard Blundel, Business School, The Open University, and Dr Christopher Shaw, Climate Outreach
  • Building on Design Matters: The co-design of school building guidance
    Professor Harry Daniels and Hau Ming Tse, Department of Education, University of Oxford
  • Supporting Developing Country Governments to Shape Global Economic Governance
    Dr Emily Jones, Associate Professor at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford

4D TARGET GROUP WORKSHOP: Could business be the vehicle for sustaining your impact?

Workshop led by: Dr Mark Mann and Dr Owen Metters, Oxford University Innovation, University of Oxford

In this workshop participants will explore alternative ways they can deliver impact via business activities. Find out more about the different approaches you could take e.g. not-for-profit, social enterprise, licensing and crowd funding models.

4E SKILLS WORKSHOP: The expert guide to social media: how to know if it’s working (or not)

Workshop led by: Minna Lehtinen, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford

Social media continues to be ever more important for researchers: not only in terms of disseminating research and putting it out into the wider world, but also for some projects it is a source of data in its own right. How can you get the best out of social media for you and your research? And how can you tell if it is making a difference? What do you need to think about in terms of using social media metrics? Our experienced social media professional is here to guide you.

Keynote speakers

We are delighted to welcome Dr Caroline Kenny, UCL and Social Science Advisor at the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology and Alun Evans, Chief Executive of the British Academy to give keynote addresses to close our conference.

As Social Sciences Advisor at POST, Caroline Kenny leads a research programme to study the use of research evidence within parliamentary debate and scrutiny, including the impact of POST. In her talk she will reveal the role that social sciences research currently plays in parliamentary activity, outline ways in which social scientists should look to engage with parliamentarians and will tell us more about the recent report investigating how research evidence is used in Parliament.

Alun Evans, Chief Executive of the British Academy, the UK’s national body for the humanities and social sciences, will advocate for the positive role that social sciences research can play in making a difference in society and the economy, relating this to current challenges and socio-political context with some lessons for researchers to take forward.

 

Dr Caroline Kenny, Social Science Adviser for the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology

Dr Caroline Kenny

Caroline Kenny is seconded full time to the UK Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST) as a social science adviser. This position is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. At POST, Caroline leads a research programme to study the use of research evidence within parliamentary debate and scrutiny, including the impact of POST.

Prior to joining POST, Caroline worked for the Evidence for Policy and Practice Information and Co-ordinating Centre (EPPI-Centre) at the Institute of Education, University of London. Here, she worked on two European Commission funded projects studying the use of research in education policy and practice and has supported policy-makers and practitioners from across the UK and Europe to use research in their decision making.

Caroline has a PhD in Political Science from the University of Birmingham, an MA in Research Methods from the University of Birmingham and an MA in Public Administration and Public Policy from the University of York.

 

Alun Evans, Chief Executive of the British Academy

 Alun Evans, Chief Executive of the British Academy

Alun Evans has been Chief Executive of the British Academy since July 2015.

Prior to his appointment as British Academy Chief Executive, Alun was Director of the Scotland Office, which represents Scottish interests in the UK government and the UK government in Scotland.

Before taking up his role as head of the Scotland Office, Alun was Secretary of the Detainee Inquiry from 2010 to 2012, and prior to that, Head of Strategy at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), Director-General in the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS) and Director-General (Transformation) in the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG). He has also been Principal Private Secretary to three Secretaries of State and worked as Head of Strategic Communications at 10 Downing Street and as Director of Communications to the former Deputy Prime Minister.

Alun was born in 1958. After his first degree in Government at Essex University, he took an MPhil in Politics and Russian Studies at the University of Birmingham and is currently working towards a PhD in Modern Political History at Queen Mary, University of London.

He is also an Associate at the Institute for Government where he has contributed to a range of Institute projects, including on government transitions, policy making and communication.