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We are excited to present a programme encompassing researchers from across the O2RB partnership universities and from a diversity of disciplinary backgrounds and career stages. Equally, we are pleased to welcome some of the non-academic project partners, so crucial in the delivery of impact.

Impact acceleration projects

SESSION 1 Presenters 

1A Dr Catherine Fallon Grasham, Oxford University Centre for the Environment, University of Oxford

Catherine is a postdoctoral researcher on the REACH project - improving water security for poor people in Africa and Asia – in the School of Geography and the Environment at Oxford University. She is a social scientist who uses mixed research methods to explore water-poverty linkages in Ethiopia and Kenya. She has recently completed PhD research on the relationships between water-allocation decisions, urban WASH and rural livelihoods in Ethiopia at the University of East Anglia.

1A Dr Sara de Wit, Institute for Science, Innovation and Society, University of Oxford

Sara de is part of the Forecasts for Anticipatory Humanitarian Action (FATHUM) project. Trained in anthropology and African Studies Sara has a strong empirical orientation, with long-term fieldwork experience in southeast Madagascar, the Bamenda Grassfields in Cameroon and Maasailand in northern Tanzania. She has carried out "ethnographies of aid" – at the intersection of STS, development theories, environmental anthropology and postcolonial studies – in which she broadly focused on how globally circulating ideas, such as climate change and notions of development, travel, and what happens when they are translated by varying actors along the translation chain.

1B Prof Abigail Adams, Department of Economics, University of Oxford

Abi read Philosophy, Politics, and Economics as an undergraduate at Oriel College, Oxford before undertaking an ESRC funded DPhil in Economics at New College. Upon finishing her doctorate in 2013, she was elected to a Junior Research Fellow at Merton College, Oxford and subsequently held a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the Cowles Foundation, Yale University. Since 2013, she has also been a Research Associate at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, London and in 2016 she won an ESRC Future Research Leaders award shortly after election to her Fellowship at New College.

Abi's research sits within Applied Microeconomics, often focused on the econometrics of consumer and family choice. Her current research concerns the identification and estimation of consumer preferences when a) not all options are available (consideration set models; inattention); b) individuals have a 'preference for flexibility' (menu choice; decision making under ambiguity).

1B Dr Naomi Creutzfeldt, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford

Dr. Naomi Creutzfeldt is a Senior Lecturer in Law at the University of Westminster. Her current ESRC funded research project (together with Chris Gill, Glasgow) is on "Access to Justice, Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), and consumer vulnerability in the European energy sector." Before this she worked at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford (held an ESRC FRL & ESRC IAA) . Her interests in ADR, as pathways of informal dispute resolution, have a broader scope, addressing questions of access to justice, vulnerability, and consumer protection. Naomi is a member of the Common Room at Wolfson College (Oxford) and a civil and commercial mediator.

1B Dr Rudina Jasini, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford

Rudina Jasini is an attorney and researcher specialising in international criminal law and human rights law. As an Economic Social Research Council (ESRC) fellow at the Faculty of Law, she is currently leading with Prof Carolyn Hoyle the ESRC Impact Acceleration Award (IAA) project "Advancing the Impact of Victim Participation at the International Criminal Court: Developing Avenues for Collaboration'' in cooperation with the International Criminal Court Office of Public Counsel for Victims and the International Criminal Court Bar Association. This project builds upon her research at the University of Oxford. It focuses on co-designing resources for the education and training of legal representatives for victims at the ICC. Previously, Rudina was appointed as an ESRC Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) Postdoctoral Fellow at Oxford and a Postdoctoral Global Fellow at New York University Center for Human Rights and Global Justice. Rudina has also held appointments as a visiting scholar at Harvard Law School and the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law. Prior to her time at Oxford, Rudina worked as an attorney for the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague on the defence team in the Haradinaj case. She has also worked with the legal team providing representation and assistance to victims of the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia, in the prosecution of Kaing Geuk Eav (a/k/a Duch). Rudina holds a DPhil and an MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Oxford University, an LLM in International Legal Studies from Georgetown University Law Center and a BA in Law from the University of Tirana.

1B Frances Winter, Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford

Frances joined Young Lives in February 2016 and leads our policy work on gender and youth. She has worked on gender, equality and children's rights internationally and in the UK for more than twenty years. She has a Masters in Social Policy and Planning in Developing Countries from the London School of Economics. Before joining Young Lives Frances worked as Principal Policy Adviser for the Children's Commissioner for England, and previously for agencies including Save the Children, Citizens Advice, the UK's Department for International Development, Social Development Direct and ActionAid. She has worked in Nepal, Thailand, India, Sri Lanka and Vietnam.

1C Dr Lesley Hoggart, School of Health, Wellbeing and Social Care, The Open University

Dr Lesley Hoggart is currently Director of Research having previously been a Senior Lecturer in Public Health. Her research interests are focused on reproductive health, abortion policy and politics, teenage pregnancy and sexual health, and she has a strong track record of research and publication in these areas. Her recent work includes funding from both the Wellcome Trust and ESRC into understanding and challenging stigma surrounding abortion. She has also a considerable body of work about the impact of teenage pregnancy and embodied experiences of contraception.

1C Dr Imogen Goold, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford

Imogen Goold studied Law and Modern History at the University of Tasmania, Australia, receiving her PhD in 2005. Her doctoral research explored the use of property law to regulate human body parts. She also received a Masters degree in Bioethics from the University of Monash in 2005. From 1999, she was a research member of the Centre for Law and Genetics, where she published on surrogacy laws, legal constraints on access to infertility treatments and proprietary rights in human tissue. In 2002, she took up as position as a Legal Officer at the Australian Law Reform Commission, working on the inquiries into Genetic Information Privacy and Gene Patenting. After leaving the ALRC in 2004, she worked briefly at the World Health Organisation, researching the provision of genetic medical services in developing countries. She is now examining the impact of moral arguments on the regulation of IVF and also writing a book based on her work on body part ownership.

1C Dr Avril Maddrell, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Reading

Avril Maddrell is Associate Professor in Human Geography at the University of Reading, and Co-Editor of the journal Social and Cultural Geography. Her research interests include spaces, landscapes and practices of death, mourning and remembrance; pilgrimage and sacred mobilities; gender; historiography; and charity shops. Key publications include: Deathscapes. Spaces for death, dying, mourning and remembrance (Ashgate, 2010, co-edited with James Sidaway); Memory, Mourning, Landscape (Rodopi, 2010, co-edited with Elizabeth Anderson, Kate McLoughlin & Alana Vincent); Christian Pilgrimage, Landscape and Heritage (Routledge, 2015, co-authored with Veronica della Dora, Alesandro Scafi and Heather Walton); Sacred Mobilities (Ashgate, 2015, co-edited with Tim Gale and Alan Terry); Contemporary Encounters in Gender and Religion (Palgrave 2017, co-edited with Lena Gemzoe and Marja-Liisa Keinanen); Complex Location (2009, Wiley-Blackwell/ RGS); and Charity Shops. Retailing, consumption and society (2002, Routledge, co-authored with Suzanne Horne).

1C Dr Brenda Mathijssen, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Reading

1C Dr Danny McNally, Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Reading

1C Professor Tina Miller, Department of Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University

Tina Miller is a Professor of Sociology at Oxford Brookes University. Her qualitative longitudinal research spans interests in family lives, motherhood and fatherhood transitions and unfolding, daily experiences of managing caring and paid work. The ways in which gender, culture and structural features shape daily experiences of these practises provides an ongoing research focus. Her work has attracted international, national academic and more popular attention. She has been appointed to advise the World Health Organisation (WHO) on issues of culture and gender in relation to maternal service provision and fatherhood as well as providing guidance in these areas for the introduction of the HPV vaccine and more recently worked on recommendations for health promotion interventions (http://www.who.int/maternal_child_adolescent/documents/health-promotion-interventions/en/). Tina has lived and worked in the Solomon Islands and Bangladesh. She has also worked with politicians, policy makers, NGOs and the media in the UK in relation to her research on gender and family lives.

1C Dr Shona Minson, Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford

Shona Minson practised family and criminal law as a barrister leading to her research interest in the intersection between family and criminal law. At the University of Oxford she analysed the place of children in maternal sentencing decisions in England and Wales: engaging with children and carers to explore the impact of maternal imprisonment, and with judiciary to examine sentencing practice. Finding that children are not appropriately safeguarded when their primary carer is sentenced she has worked to produce film resources for all sentencing professionals in England and Wales, focusing on their duty to consider children when sentencing primary carers.

1D William Allen, Centre on Migration Policy and Society, University of Oxford  

William Allen is a Research Officer at the Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society (COMPAS) at the University of Oxford. His researxch focuses on the ways that media talk about immigration, and how this impacts what people think. He also conducts research on the ways that researchers communicate migration data through data visualisations, having been Co-Investigator on the AHRC-funded project 'Seeing Data' (2013-15). His work on evidence use among UK civil society organisations won the inaugural 2016 Carol Weiss Prize given by the editors of the journal Evidence & Policy for the best article written by an early-career researcher.

1D Dr Christopher Shaw, Climate Outreach

Chris works at the interface of climate policy and the public, connecting research and practice. He returned to university to study for his PhD when he was 40. In that time he has worked for Sussex University, Nottingham University and Oxford University. At Climate Outreach he has worked in partnership with Oxford University, Cardiff University, Open University, Exeter University and universities in Europe. We have also worked with businesses, NGOs, governments, and international policy institutions, applying academic research to the real world problem of public engagement.

1E Claire Bolderson and Caroline Finnigan, Engaging Communications

Caroline Finnigan is a former BBC senior producer. Claire Bolderson is a former BBC News correspondent and presenter. Both continue to make documentaries for the BBC. In addition to running workshops on engagement with the media, with policy makers and with funders, they also train journalists in the UK and internationally.

 

SESSION 2 Presenters

2A Professor Lucie Cluver, Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford

Lucie is a PI on several ongoing trials in Southern and Eastern Africa, all part of the Parenting for Lifelong Health Initiative – a collaboration between the World Health Organisation, UNICEF and academics to provide evidence-based non-commercialised child violence prevention programs for LMIC www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/child/PLH-manuals/en/ These include the Sinovuyo Teen trial (with Dr Franziska Meinck and Dr Jenny Doubt) – a cluster randomised trial (n=1100, 40 sites) of a program for families with adolescents www.ox.ac.uk/news/2015-05-26-tackling-child-abuse-africa-research-and-fun, the Sinovuyo Kids trial (with Prof Cathy Ward at University of Cape Town and Dr Jamie Lachman) for caregivers of 3-9 year olds, and the Mphatlalatsane trial (with Prof Mark Tomlinson and Prof Lorraine Sherr) for parents of toddlers in Lesotho. Working with a large and dedicated team in close collaboration with policymakers, Lucie has pioneered research on 'cash plus care' – examining the impacts of social protection and psychosocial care on adolescent health www.esrc.ac.uk/news-events-and-publications/impact-case-studies/preventing-hiv-risk-in-southern-africa/. She has led three major longitudinal studies: the 'Young Carers Study' (2008-2012, with Dr Mark Boyes) was the world's largest study of risk and resilience amongst AIDS-affected children, following 6000 children longitudinally in South Africa, the 'Orphan Resilience Study' (2005-2009 with Prof Frances Gardner) followed 1000 children over four years to identify impacts of orphanhood. Currently, she leads the first community-based large panel of HIV-positive adolescents and community controls, including 1500 adolescents in South Africa (with Dr Elona Toska), which integrates qualitative research led by Dr Rebecca Hodes (University of Cape Town). The team's work has won a number of awards, including the ESRC Outstanding International Impact Prize (2017), the Philip Leverhulme Prize (2015), the International AIDS Society Young Investigator Award (2014), and the Discovery Clinical Excellence Award (2013). They have published over 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals including the Lancet Global Health, AIDS, JAIDS, J Child Psychiatry and Psychology, Social Science and Medicine, AIDS Care and Prevention Science.

2A Dr Weizi Li, Henley Business School, University of Reading

Dr. Weizi Li, Associate Professor of Informatics, Deputy Director in Informatics Research Centre, Henley Business School. Her research focuses on digital health, integrated system, artificial intelligence and machine learning applications in healthcare. She is a Fellow of Charted Institute of IT (FBCS). She worked as the system and policy analyst in Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, for the development of integrated research governance system in the largest NHS organization in North Wales. She is actively involved in and leads projects with industries, through European commission, Knowledge Transfer Partnership, Innovate UK, National Natural Science Foundation of China, and industry funded projects to provide digital solution to public and private sector. Her research output of integrated health data integration platform has been successfully implemented in more than 400 hospitals in China. She is now working with Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust and Sinldo Information Technology (Beijing) to bring AI and big data analytics in UK and China health system.

2B Maria Rebeca Barron Rodriguez, Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford

Maria holds a Bachelor's Degree in Law from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru (PUCP), and a Master of Public Policy from the University of Oxford. She is currently studying the MSc in Evidence-Based Social Intervention and Policy Evaluation at the University of Oxford, and research assistant at RISE (Research for Improving Systems of Education). She came to Oxford after having worked at the Ministry of Education of Peru for two years developing social programmes with a focus on teachers policies. Previously, she has worked as a consultant on land governance and indigenous peoples rights for the World Bank and Peruvian NGOs. Her main research interests revolve around social programmes to improve teachers and students performance within education systems, as well as, strategies to promote the use of evidence and the evaluation of social policies by policymakers in developing countries.

2B Dr Karin Eli, School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, University of Oxford

Karin Eli is a medical anthropologist whose research focuses on eating disorders, obesity, and the body, alongside food activism, social class, and social mobility. Karin's research ranges from analyses of narrative, identity, and embodied experience to the structures of socioeconomic stratification and food governance. Through her interlinked research foci, Karin interrogates eating disorders and obesity as multi-level conditions that call for integrated phenomenological and structural approaches. Her current research projects focus on identifying links between multi-generational social class, social mobility, wellbeing, and obesity, and on assessing longitudinal relationships between socioeconomic insecurity and eating disorders.

2B Briony Turner, Institute for Environmental Analytics, University of Reading (and Katie Jenkins, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford

Katie Jenkins has been employed as a postdoctoral research associate at the Environmental Change Institute since April 2011, where she has worked on various multidisciplinary projects with a focus on integrated assessment of climate impacts and adaptation strategies. Throughout these projects Katie has liaised with different stakeholder groups and researchers to understand and integrate research models and outputs to support the modelling of various risks. Katie has a keen interest in the need to consider and design research outputs in a manner that is useable and useful to end-users involved with climate adaptation policy and climate services, and has built upon this through various Impact Awards.

2C Dr Tracey Denton-Calabrese, Department of Education, University of Oxford

Tracey Denton-Calabrese completed her DPhil in Education at Oxford as a member of the Learning and New Technologies Research Group. She is currently a postdoctoral researcher for the Go_Girl Code+Create programme and was awarded an Oxford University ESRC IAA, RCUK Innovation Fellowship.

2C Dr Carol Fuller, Institute of Education, University of Reading

A sociologist with an interested in the social construction of identity

Full profile: https://www.reading.ac.uk/education/about/staff/c-l-fuller.aspx

2C Allison Mishkin, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford

Allison is a joint PhD/MBA student between the Yale School of Management and the Oxford Internet Institute. Her PhD focuses on how technical and educational innovations influence girls' development. Outside of her academic pursuits, Allison started Bit by Bit, an annual conference that aims to create a social community for high school women interested in STEM. A Thouron fellow, Allison received with her MSc from Oxford University as the Google Graduate Scholar at the Oxford Internet Institute. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Pennsylvania with an individualized degree in the Social Implications of Computer Science.

2C Dr Jonah Rimer, School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, University of Oxford

Jonah Rimer has a DPhil in Anthropology and MPhil in Medical Anthropology from Oxford University. His research areas are child abuse, online sexual offending, social science of the Internet, childhood and youth studies, and the justice system. He has worked in child abuse prevention, and is currently a Research Associate in the Oxford University School of Anthropology, a Senior Research Associate in the Ryerson University School of Child and Youth Care, and a Postdoctoral Researcher in the University of PEI Young Lives Research Lab. He collaborates with colleagues in Canada, Europe, and Australia across academia, police forces, and non-profit organizations.

2D Dr Katharine Burn, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

Katharine is the Director of the Oxford Education Deanery. Her research is on teachers' professional learning and she is an acknowledged expert in this field. She was involved for a number of years in the Developing Expertise of Beginning Teachers project, a longitudinal study tracking secondary school teachers through their PGCE year and on into the first and second year of teaching. Her most recent book (with Trevor Mutton, Hazel Hagger and Kate Thirlwall) is 'Teacher Education Partnerships', coming out in April 2018. Katharine is also Chair of the Secondary Committee of the Historical Association and a co-editor of the professional journal 'Teaching History'.

2D Dr Velda Elliott,  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

Velda's main research is at the intersection of English literature and education, looking at policy, curriculum, teaching and assessment. Her work on public engagement especially focuses on connecting teachers with literary criticism on the texts they teach, and she created the Twitter hashtag #LitCritForTeachers, and regularly blogs on this topic. In 2016 she led the review on written marking for the Educational Endowment Foundation aimed at schools and teachers which was published as 'A Marked Improvement?' She won the National Association for the Teaching of English Research Award in 2017.

2D Dr Jenni Ingram, Department of Education, University of Oxford

Jenni's research is in the teaching of mathematics and the analysis of classroom discourse. Her Talk in Mathematics (TIM) project, funded by the John Fell Fund, conducted research with local mathematics departments which led to a video-based CPD programme that enabled teachers to take up opportunities and work around obstacles within their own practice to develop their students' use and understanding of mathematical communication. The initial work is now being used by other schools as part of their teacher professional development programme and with this the aspects of practice have moved beyond the initial focus on language use in mathematics.

2D Dr Jessica Lutkin, Research Enterprise Services, University of Reading

Jessica Lutkin has been an Impact Officer since September 2016, specialising in providing support for the arts and humanities disciplines. She gained her PhD in history in 2008, after which she was a research assistant on a number of projects. She was the impact officer and education officer on the AHRC funded 'England's Immigrants 1330-1550' project, for which education impact played a key role in the progress of the project. She has worked with education specialists, The National Archives, the OCR, the Historical Association and The Runnymede Trust to develop, evidence and evaluate effective education impact strategies.

2E Dr Julie Bayley, ARMA Impact Champion

Julie Bayley is an impact specialist, academic researcher and Health Psychologist at Coventry University. She has been an applied researcher for over 14 years and has conducted a wide range of research primarily in public health, adolescent sexual health and behaviour change interventions.

Following a role as academic partner on a Jisc project (2012) to develop an impact capture system, Julie was seconded into the Vice Chancellor's office (2014-6) as Coventry University's Impact Officer. In this role she supported impact institution-wide through strategy development, funding bid support and running training for early to late career research staff and research managers.

Julie also works at a sector level, with a key focus on professional development and improving impact culture. She has a national reputation for building impact capacity within the sector, and in 2015 won the inaugural Association of Research Managers and Administrators (ARMA) Impact Award in recognition of her work. Julie is co-champion of the ARMA Impact Special Interest Group, and leads national impact training through her position on ARMA's Training and Development committee. She also sits on the Consortia Advancing Standards in Research Administration Information (CASRAI) Impact and Career Levels working groups, and maintains a national and international profile in impact, behaviour change, impact strategy development and improving impact culture.

Having recently returned to an academic post, Julie is currently collaborating internationally on developing the concept of impact literacy and the associated development of standards for knowledge broker competencies. She has also been directly commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research to review of their 'Invention for Innovation' (i4i) funding scheme and support wider activities of the central impact team.

SESSION 3 PRESENTERS

3A Professor Danny Dorling, School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford

Danny Dorling joined the School of Geography and the Environment in September 2013 to take up the Halford Mackinder Professorship in Geography. He was previously a professor of Geography at the University of Sheffield. He has also worked in Newcastle, Bristol, Leeds and New Zealand, went to university in Newcastle upon Tyne, and to school in Oxford.

Much of Danny's work is available open access (see www.dannydorling.org). With a group of colleagues he helped create the website www.worldmapper.org which shows who has most and least in the world. His work concerns issues of housing, health, employment, education, wealth and poverty. His recent books include, co-authored texts The Atlas of the Real World: Mapping the way we live and Bankrupt Britain: An atlas of social change.

3A   Madeleine Sumption AND MIKAL MAST, The Migration Observatory, University of Oxford

 

3B Susila Davis-Singaravelu, Department of Education, University of Oxford

Susila Davis-Singaravelu is an ESRC scholar currently studying for a doctorate in education at the University of Oxford. Her focus is on primary school practitioner engagement with Oxford University Press Pathways to School Improvement. Susila also teaches on research methodologies and use of software such as NVivo for qualitative data analysis. Her Masters research investigated the learning and educational experiences of young people and youth workers in a youth programme in South East England. Susila was a research and data analyst at the Specialist Schools and Academies Trust for several years.

3B Jessica Lorimer, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford and Oliver Tailby (Chipping Norton School)

3B Professor Andrew Stephen, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford

Professor Andrew Stephen is one of the world's leading marketing academics and is an well-regarded researcher and thought leader on how firms and consumers use digital technologies, such as mobile devices and social media, in commercial contexts. He is the founding director of the Oxford Future of Marketing Initiative at the Saïd Business School, which is an impact-oriented and research-driven collaboration between Oxford academics and some of the world's leading marketing-focused companies that seeks to understand and inform the future of marketing theory and practice.

3C Dr Sudhir Rama Murthy, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford

Sudhir Rama Murthy is a Research Fellow on the 'Mutuality in Business' project at the Said Business School, Oxford. His research interests are in sustainable manufacturing and sustainable industrialisation. Sudhir's research focus is on Business Models of shared benefit among multiple stakeholders, and cross-sector partnerships as part of route-to-market programmes in India and beyond. He is also an 'Early Career Research Fellow' of the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship. He was a Manmohan Singh Scholar of St John's College, University of Cambridge, for his PhD in Engineering. He holds Bachelors and Masters Degrees from India.

3C Alistair Colin-Jones, Mars Inc.

Alastair Colin-Jones is the Senior Manager for Business Research at Mars Catalyst. He is based in Oxford and is responsible for supporting the day-to-day management of the joint Oxford-Mars research programme. 

Previously, Alastair was the Knowledge Manager at the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Saïd Business School.

3C Professor Shailey Minocha, FACULTY OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS, THE OPEN UNIVERSITY

Shailey Minocha is Professor of Learning Technologies and Social Computing in the Faculty of STEM of The Open University, UK. The focus of her research is understanding users' interactions with technology and investigating the factors that affect usability, user experience and user adoption of technology-enabled systems. Shailey's profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shaileyminocha/

3C Dr Ana Despina-Tudor, Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, The Open University

Ana-Despina Tudor is a Research Associate in the Faculty of STEM of The Open University, UK. She graduated from Technische Universitaet Ilmenau, Germany with a PhD dissertation in immersive virtual reality applications design for communication skills training. She has an MA degree in communication science and media studies. Ana's profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anadespinatudor/

3C Dr Joseph Wherton , Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford 

Dr Joe Wherton is a Senior Researcher at the University of Oxford. He has a background in psychology and human-computer interaction and his research focuses on the participatory design of assisted living technologies and services. His research is strongly interdisciplinary, involving ethnographic and participatory design methods to inform the development and implementation of technology-supported services for health and social care. Joe obtained his Psychology BSc at University of Bath (2004) and his Psychology PhD at University of York (2008). He is committed to working in collaboration with industry, health and social care organisations to develop useful and useable assisted living solutions. 

3D Professor Lucie Cluver, Roxanna Haghighat, Maria Michalopoulou, and Camille Wittesaele, Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford

Lucie is a PI on several ongoing trials in Southern and Eastern Africa, all part of the Parenting for Lifelong Health Initiative – a collaboration between the World Health Organisation, UNICEF and academics to provide evidence-based non-commercialised child violence prevention programs for LMIC www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/child/PLH-manuals/en/ These include the Sinovuyo Teen trial (with Dr Franziska Meinck and Dr Jenny Doubt) – a cluster randomised trial (n=1100, 40 sites) of a program for families with adolescents www.ox.ac.uk/news/2015-05-26-tackling-child-abuse-africa-research-and-fun, the Sinovuyo Kids trial (with Prof Cathy Ward at University of Cape Town and Dr Jamie Lachman) for caregivers of 3-9 year olds, and the Mphatlalatsane trial (with Prof Mark Tomlinson and Prof Lorraine Sherr) for parents of toddlers in Lesotho. Working with a large and dedicated team in close collaboration with policymakers, Lucie has pioneered research on 'cash plus care' – examining the impacts of social protection and psychosocial care on adolescent health www.esrc.ac.uk/news-events-and-publications/impact-case-studies/preventing-hiv-risk-in-southern-africa/. She has led three major longitudinal studies: the 'Young Carers Study' (2008-2012, with Dr Mark Boyes) was the world's largest study of risk and resilience amongst AIDS-affected children, following 6000 children longitudinally in South Africa, the 'Orphan Resilience Study' (2005-2009 with Prof Frances Gardner) followed 1000 children over four years to identify impacts of orphanhood. Currently, she leads the first community-based large panel of HIV-positive adolescents and community controls, including 1500 adolescents in South Africa (with Dr Elona Toska), which integrates qualitative research led by Dr Rebecca Hodes (University of Cape Town). The team's work has won a number of awards, including the ESRC Outstanding International Impact Prize (2017), the Philip Leverhulme Prize (2015), the International AIDS Society Young Investigator Award (2014), and the Discovery Clinical Excellence Award (2013). They have published over 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals including the Lancet Global Health, AIDS, JAIDS, J Child Psychiatry and Psychology, Social Science and Medicine, AIDS Care and Prevention Science.

3E William Allen, Centre on Migration, Policy and Society, University of Oxford 

William Allen is a Research Officer at the Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society (COMPAS) at the University of Oxford. His research focuses on the ways that media talk about immigration, and how this impacts what people think. He also conducts research on the ways that researchers communicate migration data through data visualisations, having been Co-Investigator on the AHRC-funded project 'Seeing Data' (2013-15). His work on evidence use among UK civil society organisations won the inaugural 2016 Carol Weiss Prize given by the editors of the journal Evidence & Policy for the best article written by an early-career researcher.

3E Ida Persson, ActREAL

 Ida Persson worked at COMPAS between 2010-2015 as Research and Communications Officer where her role included research assistance, event management and website/social media management. She was involved Exploring Migration: Research and Drama in Schools,

Ida is now the Creative Director of actREAL, whose mission is to bring academic research on social issues into the community by using theatre and performance to bring it to life. This combines Ida's academic background in international law and human rights (University of Warwick and University for Peace) with her practice and experience in theatre over many years. For any queries about working with actREAL to engage the public with your research please contact us at admin@actreal.org.

Ida is currently working with COMPAS on a theatre componenet of The Ethics and Politics of the Refugee Crisis project. Ida is also working with COMPAS to explore new project ideas, including various joint project proposals.

 

SESSION 4 PRESENTERS

4a Prof Abigail Adams,, Department of Economics, University of Oxford

Abi read Philosophy, Politics, and Economics as an undergraduate at Oriel College, Oxford before undertaking an ESRC funded DPhil in Economics at New College. Upon finishing her doctorate in 2013, she was elected to a Junior Research Fellow at Merton College, Oxford and subsequently held a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the Cowles Foundation, Yale University. Since 2013, she has also been a Research Associate at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, London and in 2016 she won an ESRC Future Research Leaders award shortly after election to her Fellowship at New College.

Abi's research sits within Applied Microeconomics, often focused on the econometrics of consumer and family choice. Her current research concerns the identification and estimation of consumer preferences when a) not all options are available (consideration set models; inattention); b) individuals have a 'preference for flexibility' (menu choice; decision making under ambiguity).

4a Dr Carlotta Minnella, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford and Louise Barton (Foreign and Commonwealth Office, UK)

Carlotta Minnella is a Lecturer in International Relations at the Oxford Politics and IR department. She has held research fellowships at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University and the START research programme on terrorism at the University of Maryland. Before returning to Oxford, Carlotta was an associate lecturer in International Relations at the Department of Politics at the University of York. Carlotta's research focuses on international counter-terrorism cooperation, in particular in counter-terrorism financing, anti-money laundering, sanctions, human rights, and CVE policies.

4b Dr Rebecca Ferguson, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University

Rebecca is an executive member of the Society for Learning Analytics Research and a leading member of the international learning analytics community. Her work has been influential in shaping the field, supporting implementation across Europe, and promoting a focus on social learning analytics. She has been invited to lead events in this area on five continents, including several associated with her work as principal investigator on the European Learning Analytics Community Exchange (LACE) and on LAEP, which helped European policymakers to set out an agenda for high-quality and stimulating ways of learning and teaching through the use of learning analytics.

4b Dr R. Harris, Institute of Education, University of Reading with Fiona Craig and Neil Gauld, Ufton Court Trust

Harris' research is particularly focused on history education, such as students' perceptions of history, the purposes of history education and the impact of policy on curriculum enactment. He has published many articles in journals, such as the Journal of Curriculum Studies, Journal of Education Policy and the Oxford Review of Education, as well as for a professional audience in Teaching History. He is a former chair of the Historical Association's secondary committee, has advised the former QCA and the DfE on history education, and has worked extensively for the Council of Europe regarding teacher training and in history education.

4b Dr Maria Kambouri-Danos, Institute of Education, University of Reading

Maria Kambouri-Danos, PhD (University of Warwick, UK) is a lecturer in Early Years Childhood Care and Education at the University of Reading. Before and while completing her PhD in 2012, she worked as an early years teacher in settings and schools in the UK and Cyprus, for over six years. Maria is interested in the way that children acquire knowledge and develop their skills and understanding during their early years of life. She strongly believes in the power of play based learning and the importance of parental involvement and differentiation, which are the core philosophies of her pedagogical propositions. At the moment, Maria is the Principal Investigator and leading a team of researchers working on the 4Ps Project "Practitioners and Parents Play Partnership" (funded by The Froebel Trust), at the University of Reading. Online profile: https://www.reading.ac.uk/education/about/staff/m-kambouridanos.aspx

4C Professor Richard Blundel, Business School, The Open University

Richard is an organisational researcher with a particular interest in the links between entrepreneurial activity, innovation and environmental sustainability. A common theme in Richard's work is an examination of the nature and consequences of growth in different organisational contexts, including small artisanal food producers, manufacturing businesses and social enterprises. He is an Honorary Fellow at the ESRC Centre for Understanding Sustainable Prosperity (CUSP), University of Surrey. Other recent projects include the ESRC Seminar Series: 'Green Innovation: Making it Work' (2015-17) and a related Special Issue of the International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation (February 2018)

4C Dr Christopher Shaw, Climate Outreach

Chris works at the interface of climate policy and the public, connecting research and practice. He returned to university to study for his PhD when he was 40. In that time he has worked for Sussex University, Nottingham University and Oxford University. At Climate Outreach he has worked in partnership with Oxford University, Cardiff University, Open University, Exeter University and universities in Europe. We have also worked with businesses, NGOs, governments, and international policy institutions, applying academic research to the real world problem of public engagement.

4C Professor Harry Daniels, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

Professor Harry Daniels has directed more than 40 research projects funded by ESRC, various central and local government sources, The Lottery, The Nuffield Foundation and the EU. His current research projects concern exclusion from school and the implications of new school design. Two completed major studies; "Learning in and for interagency working: Multiagency work in Northern Ireland ESRC TLRP" and "Learning in and for Interagency Working ESRC TLRP", were both rated 'Outstanding'. Follow up work led to significant impact in practitioner/policy making bodies funded by a consortium of The Local Government Association, IdEA and Local Authorities Research Council Initiative.

4C Hau Ming Tse, Department of Education, University of Oxford

Hau Ming is an invited expert for the Department of Education, UK and member of the Technical Advisory Group for the OECD Centre for Effective Learning Environments. Hau Ming was an Associate Director at David Chipperfield Architects until 2007. Selected projects include the Hepworth Gallery, Wakefield and the Headquarters of BBC Scotland, Glasgow. Her current research focuses on productive points of interaction and innovation between theory and practice in learning environments. Design Matters? funded by the AHRC examines the complex relationship between design and practice in some of the most challenging secondary schools in the UK.

4C Dr Emily Jones, Associate Professor at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford

My research examines government practices in asymmetric negotiations in the global economy. I investigate the ways in which small developing countries exert influence even in highly asymmetric negotiations. I direct the Global Economic Governance Programme, a research programme co-hosted by the Blavatnik School of Government and University College Oxford. Our Programme fosters research and debate on how to make the global economy inclusive and sustainable. I previously worked in Ghana's Ministry of Trade and Industry, for Oxfam GB, and for the UK Department for International Development. I have consulted for a variety of international organisations and run executive training courses.

4D Dr Mark Mann, OXFORD UNIVERSITY INNOVATION, UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

I have been the Innovation Lead for Humanities and Social Science at OUI for 2 years. We have a portfolio of about 70 projects across the two divisions which range from consultancy, services, spinouts and social enterprises which maximise the impact from research outputs.

After a degree in Natural Sciences and a PhD in carbon nanotubes and electron emission, Mark continued as a Research Associate at Cambridge University Engineering Department, diversifying into nanotechnology, thin films, devices and displays. Whilst there he also undertook undergraduate teaching of both Physics and Electrical Engineering, project-managed UK government and EU-sponsored collaborative projects and undertook a variety of graduate and undergraduate teaching.

In 2010, Mark left Cambridge to join the BBC's Research & Development Department where he retrained as a software engineer and conducted research in music information retrieval, audio broadcasting, and mobile and second screen applications. His research then focussed on image processing, especially with regard to sport. He then moved into technology transfer, covering all the technology the BBC had to license before joining Oxford University Innovation as a Technology Transfer Manager in 2015.

4D Dr Owen Metters, Oxford University Innovation, University of Oxford

Owen graduated from Durham University with a first class honours degree in Chemistry (MChem), before moving to the University of Bristol to study for a PhD in Inorganic Chemistry. His doctoral research was concerned with the synthesis and characterisation of novel frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) for use as catalysts in a wide range of transformations; from small molecule activations to the hydrogenation of organic substrates. After receiving his doctorate Owen remained at Bristol assuming the role of Research Assistant, which involved leading a variety of projects across inorganic and materials chemistry. During this time, he published several articles in peer-reviewed journals. Owen joined Oxford University Innovation Ltd. in August 2016 as an Assistant Technology Transfer Manager and in February 2018 was promoted to a Licensing and Ventures Manager in the Chemistry team.

4e Minna Lehtinen, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford

Minna is currently Research Communications and Impact Manager at the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Oxford, overseeing the department's communications and impact work from events to social media and alumni relations to knowledge exchange. Previously, she worked in research communications at the Global Development Institute at The University of Manchester and at a strategic communications agency in Washington, DC. Minna holds a BA from the University of Nottingham and an MA from Georgetown University, and is originally from Finland, despite the American accent.